theme
crime
reblogged 3 days ago & 4,026 notes

rufftoon:

veesdumpingrounds:

part 1 of my answer ! I dunno, I hope this is some help or whatever, or at least a goof startpoint for people to debate over the differences between comics and animation ? :) it’s still a good time for you to go check out my comics wwebsite haha 

Reblogging, because very very close to my own experience.

reblogged 1 week ago & 58,111 notes
amandaonwriting:

Writers can use these 12 Archetypes to create characters
The 12 Common Archetypes by Carl Golden
The twelve archetypes are divided into ego types, self types, and soul types. 
1) The Four Ego Types 1. The InnocentMotto: Free to be you and meCore desire: to get to paradiseGoal: to be happyGreatest fear: to be punished for doing something bad or wrongStrategy: to do things rightWeakness: boring for all their naive innocenceTalent: faith and optimismThe Innocent is also known as: Utopian, traditionalist, naive, mystic, saint, romantic, dreamer. 2. The Orphan/Regular Guy or GalMotto: All men and women are created equalCore Desire: connecting with othersGoal: to belongGreatest fear: to be left out or to stand out from the crowdStrategy: develop ordinary solid virtues, be down to earth, the common touchWeakness: losing one’s own self in an effort to blend in or for the sake of superficial relationshipsTalent: realism, empathy, lack of pretenceThe Regular Person is also known as: The good old boy, everyman, the person next door, the realist, the working stiff, the solid citizen, the good neighbour, the silent majority. 3. The HeroMotto: Where there’s a will, there’s a wayCore desire: to prove one’s worth through courageous actsGoal: expert mastery in a way that improves the worldGreatest fear: weakness, vulnerability, being a “chicken”Strategy: to be as strong and competent as possibleWeakness: arrogance, always needing another battle to fightTalent: competence and courageThe Hero is also known as: The warrior, crusader, rescuer, superhero, the soldier, dragon slayer, the winner and the team player. 4. The CaregiverMotto: Love your neighbour as yourselfCore desire: to protect and care for othersGoal: to help othersGreatest fear: selfishness and ingratitudeStrategy: doing things for othersWeakness: martyrdom and being exploitedTalent: compassion, generosityThe Caregiver is also known as: The saint, altruist, parent, helper, supporter. 2) The Four Soul Types         5. The ExplorerMotto: Don’t fence me inCore desire: the freedom to find out who you are through exploring the worldGoal: to experience a better, more authentic, more fulfilling lifeBiggest fear: getting trapped, conformity, and inner emptinessStrategy: journey, seeking out and experiencing new things, escape from boredomWeakness: aimless wandering, becoming a misfitTalent: autonomy, ambition, being true to one’s soulThe explorer is also known as: The seeker, iconoclast, wanderer, individualist, pilgrim. 6. The RebelMotto: Rules are made to be brokenCore desire: revenge or revolutionGoal: to overturn what isn’t workingGreatest fear: to be powerless or ineffectualStrategy: disrupt, destroy, or shockWeakness: crossing over to the dark side, crimeTalent: outrageousness, radical freedomThe Outlaw is also known as: The rebel, revolutionary, wild man, the misfit, or iconoclast. 7. The LoverMotto: You’re the only oneCore desire: intimacy and experienceGoal: being in a relationship with the people, work and surroundings they loveGreatest fear: being alone, a wallflower, unwanted, unlovedStrategy: to become more and more physically and emotionally attractiveWeakness: outward-directed desire to please others at risk of losing own identityTalent: passion, gratitude, appreciation, and commitmentThe Lover is also known as: The partner, friend, intimate, enthusiast, sensualist, spouse, team-builder. 8. The CreatorMotto: If you can imagine it, it can be doneCore desire: to create things of enduring valueGoal: to realize a visionGreatest fear: mediocre vision or executionStrategy: develop artistic control and skillTask: to create culture, express own visionWeakness: perfectionism, bad solutionsTalent: creativity and imaginationThe Creator is also known as: The artist, inventor, innovator, musician, writer or dreamer. 3) The Four Self Types 9. The JesterMotto: You only live onceCore desire: to live in the moment with full enjoymentGoal: to have a great time and lighten up the worldGreatest fear: being bored or boring othersStrategy: play, make jokes, be funnyWeakness: frivolity, wasting timeTalent: joyThe Jester is also known as: The fool, trickster, joker, practical joker or comedian. 10. The SageMotto: The truth will set you freeCore desire: to find the truth.Goal: to use intelligence and analysis to understand the world.Biggest fear: being duped, misled—or ignorance.Strategy: seeking out information and knowledge; self-reflection and understanding thought processes.Weakness: can study details forever and never act.Talent: wisdom, intelligence.The Sage is also known as: The expert, scholar, detective, advisor, thinker, philosopher, academic, researcher, thinker, planner, professional, mentor, teacher, contemplative. 11. The MagicianMotto: I make things happen.Core desire: understanding the fundamental laws of the universeGoal: to make dreams come trueGreatest fear: unintended negative consequencesStrategy: develop a vision and live by itWeakness: becoming manipulativeTalent: finding win-win solutionsThe Magician is also known as: The visionary, catalyst, inventor, charismatic leader, shaman, healer, medicine man. 12. The RulerMotto: Power isn’t everything, it’s the only thing.Core desire: controlGoal: create a prosperous, successful family or communityStrategy: exercise powerGreatest fear: chaos, being overthrownWeakness: being authoritarian, unable to delegateTalent: responsibility, leadershipThe Ruler is also known as: The boss, leader, aristocrat, king, queen, politician, role model, manager or administrator.
Note: There are four cardinal orientations: freedom, social, ego, order. The types have a place on these orientations.
Article via soulcraft.co

amandaonwriting:

Writers can use these 12 Archetypes to create characters

The 12 Common Archetypes by Carl Golden

The twelve archetypes are divided into ego types, self types, and soul types. 

1) The Four Ego Types
 
1. The Innocent
Motto: Free to be you and me
Core desire: to get to paradise
Goal: to be happy
Greatest fear: to be punished for doing something bad or wrong
Strategy: to do things right
Weakness: boring for all their naive innocence
Talent: faith and optimism
The Innocent is also known as: Utopian, traditionalist, naive, mystic, saint, romantic, dreamer.
 
2. The Orphan/Regular Guy or Gal
Motto: All men and women are created equal
Core Desire: connecting with others
Goal: to belong
Greatest fear: to be left out or to stand out from the crowd
Strategy: develop ordinary solid virtues, be down to earth, the common touch
Weakness: losing one’s own self in an effort to blend in or for the sake of superficial relationships
Talent: realism, empathy, lack of pretence
The Regular Person is also known as: The good old boy, everyman, the person next door, the realist, the working stiff, the solid citizen, the good neighbour, the silent majority.
 
3. The Hero
Motto: Where there’s a will, there’s a way
Core desire: to prove one’s worth through courageous acts
Goal: expert mastery in a way that improves the world
Greatest fear: weakness, vulnerability, being a “chicken”
Strategy: to be as strong and competent as possible
Weakness: arrogance, always needing another battle to fight
Talent: competence and courage
The Hero is also known as: The warrior, crusader, rescuer, superhero, the soldier, dragon slayer, the winner and the team player.
 
4. The Caregiver
Motto: Love your neighbour as yourself
Core desire: to protect and care for others
Goal: to help others
Greatest fear: selfishness and ingratitude
Strategy: doing things for others
Weakness: martyrdom and being exploited
Talent: compassion, generosity
The Caregiver is also known as: The saint, altruist, parent, helper, supporter.
 
2) The Four Soul Types
         
5. The Explorer
Motto: Don’t fence me in
Core desire: the freedom to find out who you are through exploring the world
Goal: to experience a better, more authentic, more fulfilling life
Biggest fear: getting trapped, conformity, and inner emptiness
Strategy: journey, seeking out and experiencing new things, escape from boredom
Weakness: aimless wandering, becoming a misfit
Talent: autonomy, ambition, being true to one’s soul
The explorer is also known as: The seeker, iconoclast, wanderer, individualist, pilgrim.
 
6. The Rebel
Motto: Rules are made to be broken
Core desire: revenge or revolution
Goal: to overturn what isn’t working
Greatest fear: to be powerless or ineffectual
Strategy: disrupt, destroy, or shock
Weakness: crossing over to the dark side, crime
Talent: outrageousness, radical freedom
The Outlaw is also known as: The rebel, revolutionary, wild man, the misfit, or iconoclast.
 
7. The Lover
Motto: You’re the only one
Core desire: intimacy and experience
Goal: being in a relationship with the people, work and surroundings they love
Greatest fear: being alone, a wallflower, unwanted, unloved
Strategy: to become more and more physically and emotionally attractive
Weakness: outward-directed desire to please others at risk of losing own identity
Talent: passion, gratitude, appreciation, and commitment
The Lover is also known as: The partner, friend, intimate, enthusiast, sensualist, spouse, team-builder.
 
8. The Creator
Motto: If you can imagine it, it can be done
Core desire: to create things of enduring value
Goal: to realize a vision
Greatest fear: mediocre vision or execution
Strategy: develop artistic control and skill
Task: to create culture, express own vision
Weakness: perfectionism, bad solutions
Talent: creativity and imagination
The Creator is also known as: The artist, inventor, innovator, musician, writer or dreamer.
 
3) The Four Self Types
 
9. The Jester
Motto: You only live once
Core desire: to live in the moment with full enjoyment
Goal: to have a great time and lighten up the world
Greatest fear: being bored or boring others
Strategy: play, make jokes, be funny
Weakness: frivolity, wasting time
Talent: joy
The Jester is also known as: The fool, trickster, joker, practical joker or comedian.
 
10. The Sage
Motto: The truth will set you free
Core desire: to find the truth.
Goal: to use intelligence and analysis to understand the world.
Biggest fear: being duped, misled—or ignorance.
Strategy: seeking out information and knowledge; self-reflection and understanding thought processes.
Weakness: can study details forever and never act.
Talent: wisdom, intelligence.
The Sage is also known as: The expert, scholar, detective, advisor, thinker, philosopher, academic, researcher, thinker, planner, professional, mentor, teacher, contemplative.
 
11. The Magician
Motto: I make things happen.
Core desire: understanding the fundamental laws of the universe
Goal: to make dreams come true
Greatest fear: unintended negative consequences
Strategy: develop a vision and live by it
Weakness: becoming manipulative
Talent: finding win-win solutions
The Magician is also known as: The visionary, catalyst, inventor, charismatic leader, shaman, healer, medicine man.
 
12. The Ruler
Motto: Power isn’t everything, it’s the only thing.
Core desire: control
Goal: create a prosperous, successful family or community
Strategy: exercise power
Greatest fear: chaos, being overthrown
Weakness: being authoritarian, unable to delegate
Talent: responsibility, leadership
The Ruler is also known as: The boss, leader, aristocrat, king, queen, politician, role model, manager or administrator.

Note: There are four cardinal orientations: freedom, social, ego, order. The types have a place on these orientations.

Article via soulcraft.co

reblogged 1 week ago & 392 notes

writeworld:

Memoir Writing For Dummies

From Memoir Writing For Dummies by Ryan Van Cleave
reblogged 2 weeks ago & 65,660 notes
tygermama:

the—-cat-is-called-hamish:

clevergirlhelps:

Biology
Biology
Creating a Race (2)
Creating Animals (2)
Disease (2)
Ecosystems (2)
Evolution (and Space)
Flora and Fauna
Genetics
Inventing Species
List of Legendary Creatures
Night Vision/Color Vision
People
Constructed Language (Conlang)
Basics/Phonology (2) (3)
Conlang
Conlang Guide
Conlang vs. English
Creating a Language (Revised)
Culture + Language
Curse Words
How to Create Your Own Language
How to Create a Language
IPA Pronunciation
Making Up Words
Culture Guides
7 Deadly Sins
Alien Cultures (2)
Alternative Medieval
Avoiding Cultural Appropriation
Avoiding Medieval Fantasy (2)
Avoiding One-Note Worlds
Avoiding Utopia
Change (2)
Class/Caste System (2)
Culture
Designing Intellectual Movements
Everything (2) (3)
Fantasy
Gender-Equal Societies
Historical Background for Ideas (2)
History
Matriarchy (2)
Nationalism
Nations
Slavery
Static World
Structure
Wandering Peoples
Economy
Basic Economics
Capitalism
Currency (2) (3)
Current Global Economies
Economic Systems
Economics (1500-1800 AD)
Economics and Government
Economics for Dummies
Economy
Inflation
International Trade (2)
Marxist Communism
Medieval Economics
Schools of Economic Thought
Socialism (2)
Types of Economic Systems
World Economy (2)
Everyday Life
Art
Ceremonies
Clothing
Clothing Terminology (2) (3) (4)
Clothing Reference
Demographics
Disease
Drugs
Education (2)
Fame and Infamy
Family
Food (2)
Food Timeline
Immigration/Emigration
Literature
Marriage
Months
Music
Sex
Slang
Stories
Travel
Government
Collective/Traditionalist Societies
Creating a Government
Diplomacy
Empire (2)
Fancy Latin Names for Government
History and Politics
International Relations (2)
Justice System
Lawlessness
Non-monarchical (2) (3)
Oppressive Government
Political Ideologies
Propaganda
Republic
Rise and Fall of Civilizations
Secret Societies
Shapeshifter Society
Totalitarianism, Atmosphere Necessary For
Tribal Society
Types of Government
Utopia
Writing Politics
Read More

Ooooh.
remember, most things are social constructs. Invent your own for a totally original world!
And if the earth features, think about how that impacts things

tygermama:

the—-cat-is-called-hamish:

clevergirlhelps:

Biology

Constructed Language (Conlang)

Culture Guides

Economy

Everyday Life

Government

Read More

Ooooh.

remember, most things are social constructs. Invent your own for a totally original world!

And if the earth features, think about how that impacts things

reblogged 2 weeks ago & 213,507 notes
Things almost every author needs to research

clevergirlhelps:

the-right-writing:

  • How bodies decompose
  • Wilderness survival skills
  • Mob mentality
  • Other cultures
  • What it takes for a human to die in a given situation
  • Common tropes in your genre
  • Average weather for your setting

yoooo

reblogged 3 weeks ago & 69,068 notes

eruphadriel:

geekgirlsmash:

nudityandnerdery:

feigenbaumsworld:

tako-owowo:

zeick-geist:

characterdesigninspiration:

I got bored and made a giant character generator.  7 different categories with at least 17 options each (some have more), including fantasy, sci-fi, supernatural, modern, and historical possibilities… which means that characters can get ridiculous really fast (like flamethrower-wielding, Feudal Japanese cyborg priestess with a pet unicorn). Have fun with what you get or try a few times if you want a serious character. 

If you do make a character with this, tag ‘characterdesigninspiration’ so I can see them!

I got a viking werewolf ranger with brass knuckles a horse and freckles 

That’s so fucking metal I can’t even begin

I’m a muscular horned-dragon bard dsguised as a medieval peasant. I carry a scythe as I roam the countryside telling the stories of my people with my trusty scorpion sidekick George O’Malley.

I’m a chubby dragon rogue who wears modern military gear and glasses whilst using my laser gun on hijinks with my companion, the dinosaur.

I’m a wide hipped, forked tongued, laser gun wielding, post apocalyptic, shapeshifter warrior who wanders the desolate wasteland with her beloved pet deer. 

I am a muscular, antlered/horned undead warrior, dressed as a pirate, wielding a chainsaw, with my alien companion.

reblogged 3 weeks ago & 1,585 notes
Writing Tips #141: Ten Tips for Beginning Writers

bookgeekconfessions:

image

1. Enjoy what you do.

Which means, if you don’t love spending hours at the typewriter,
computer, or whatever your medium is, don’t even start. You have to be willing
and ready to spend untold hours writing, rewriting, and writing some more.

2. Be patient.

No book has ever been written overnight. You’re in for a long
haul. This may take a year, or more. Oh, and since we’re on it: prepare to write
more than one book. Publishers want authors, not single books.

3. Allow your story to end.

This may sound trivial, but in fact it’s crucial, and a
stumbling block for many writers. You need to find an ending to your story, and
let go of it. You need to decide to end the writing and declare your novel
finished at some point.

4. Edit.

You know what I said in Tip #3? Well, your novel is not finished just because you have an ending. When you’ve written a first
draft, it’s just that: a draft. Now the real writing begins. Edit until your
eyes bleed and your fingers break off. And by this I mean: step away from your
finished draft, let it sit for a couple of weeks, and come back with a rested
mind and fresh eyes. You will see what needs to be changed.

Read More

reblogged 3 weeks ago & 544 notes
witchcraftings:

miniar:

the-ladies-love-mr-bates:

This is a most helpful spread with interesting results! :3

it’s like a combination of tarot practice and writing practice!I can see this as a “every sunday, lay the spread and turn it into a 1000 word (min) short story” thing… 
I actually might do this myself!

OH MY GODS.
YES. YES THIS WRITER DOTH APPROVE.

witchcraftings:

miniar:

the-ladies-love-mr-bates:

This is a most helpful spread with interesting results! :3

it’s like a combination of tarot practice and writing practice!
I can see this as a “every sunday, lay the spread and turn it into a 1000 word (min) short story” thing… 

I actually might do this myself!

OH MY GODS.

YES. YES THIS WRITER DOTH APPROVE.

reblogged 1 month ago & 191,827 notes
The problems of writing

clevergirlhelps:

  • Having a Beginning
  • Having an Ending
  • But WHERE’S THE MIDDLE?!?
  • HOW DO I GET TO THE ENDING
  • WHAT IS A PLOT
  • WHAT ARE PLOT DETAILS
  • WHAT IS WRITING

And most importantly:

  • HOW DO I TITLE

FRIENDS

reblogged 1 month ago & 124,691 notes

This is an excellent writing advice from Chuck Palahniuk. This was first seen on tumblr. Unfortunately, when I clicked on the link, it no longer existed.

But, I still think it’s worth sharing.

writingadvice: by Chuck Palahniuk

In six seconds, you’ll hate me.
But in six months, you’ll be a better writer.

From this point forward—at least for the next half year—you may not
use “thought” verbs. These include: Thinks, Knows, Understands,
Realizes, Believes, Wants, Remembers, Imagines, Desires, and a hundred
others you love to use.

The list should also include: Loves and Hates.
And it should include: Is and Has, but we’ll get to those later.

Until some time around Christmas, you can’t write: Kenny wondered if Monica didn’t like him going out at night…”

Instead, you’ll have to Un-pack that to something like: “The
mornings after Kenny had stayed out, beyond the last bus, until he’d
had to bum a ride or pay for a cab and got home to find Monica faking
sleep, faking because she never slept that quiet, those mornings, she’d
only put her own cup of coffee in the microwave. Never his.”

Instead of characters knowing anything, you must now present
the details that allow the reader to know them. Instead of a character
wanting something, you must now describe the thing so that the reader
wants it.

Instead of saying: “Adam knew Gwen liked him.” You’ll have
to say: “Between classes, Gwen had always leaned on his locker when he’d
go to open it. She’s roll her eyes and shove off with one foot,
leaving a black-heel mark on the painted metal, but she also left the
smell of her perfume. The combination lock would still be warm from her
butt. And the next break, Gwen would be leaned there, again.”

In short, no more short-cuts. Only specific sensory detail: action, smell, taste, sound, and feeling.

Typically,
writers use these “thought” verbs at the beginning of a paragraph (In
this form, you can call them “Thesis Statements” and I’ll rail against
those, later). In a way, they state the intention of the paragraph. And
what follows, illustrates them.

For example:
“Brenda knew she’d never make the deadline. Traffic
was backed up from the bridge, past the first eight or nine exits. Her
cell phone battery was dead. At home, the dogs would need to go out, or
there would be a mess to clean up. Plus, she’d promised to water the
plants for her neighbor…”

Do you see how the opening “thesis statement” steals the thunder of what follows? Don’t do it.

If nothing else, cut the opening sentence and place it after all the others. Better yet, transplant it and change it to: Brenda would never make the deadline.

Thinking is abstract. Knowing and believing are intangible. Your
story will always be stronger if you just show the physical actions
and details of your characters and allow your reader to do the thinking
and knowing. And loving and hating.

Don’t tell your reader: “Lisa hated Tom.”

Instead, make your case like a lawyer in court, detail by detail.

Present each piece of evidence. For example:
“During roll call,
in the breath after the teacher said Tom’s name, in that moment before
he could answer, right then, Lisa would whisper-shout ‘Butt Wipe,’ just
as Tom was saying, ‘Here’.”

One of the most-common mistakes that beginning writers make is leaving their characters alone. Writing,
you may be alone. Reading, your audience may be alone. But your
character should spend very, very little time alone. Because a solitary
character starts thinking or worrying or wondering.

For example: Waiting for the bus, Mark started to worry about how long the trip would take…”

A better break-down might be: “The schedule said the bus would come
by at noon, but Mark’s watch said it was already 11:57. You could see
all the way down the road, as far as the Mall, and not see a bus. No
doubt, the driver was parked at the turn-around, the far end of the
line, taking a nap. The driver was kicked back, asleep, and Mark was
going to be late. Or worse, the driver was drinking, and he’d pull up
drunk and charge Mark seventy-five cents for death in a fiery traffic
accident…”

A character alone must lapse into fantasy or memory, but even then
you can’t use “thought” verbs or any of their abstract relatives.

Oh, and you can just forget about using the verbs forget and remember.

No more transitions such as: “Wanda remembered how Nelson used to brush her hair.”

Instead: “Back in their sophomore year, Nelson used to brush her hair with smooth, long strokes of his hand.”

Again, Un-pack. Don’t take short-cuts.

Better yet, get your character with another character, fast.
Get them together and get the action started. Let their actions and
words show their thoughts. You—stay out of their heads.

And while you’re avoiding “thought” verbs, be very wary about using the bland verbs “is” and “have.”

For example:
“Ann’s eyes are blue.”

“Ann has blue eyes.”

Versus:

“Ann coughed and waved one hand past her face, clearing the cigarette smoke from her eyes, blue eyes, before she smiled…”

Instead of bland “is” and “has” statements, try burying your details
of what a character has or is, in actions or gestures. At its most
basic, this is showing your story instead of telling it.

And forever after, once you’ve learned to Un-pack your characters,
you’ll hate the lazy writer who settles for: “Jim sat beside the
telephone, wondering why Amanda didn’t call.”

Please. For now, hate me all you want, but don’t use thought verbs. After Christmas, go crazy, but I’d bet money you won’t.

(…)

For this month’s homework, pick through your writing and circle every “thought” verb. Then, find some way to eliminate it. Kill it by Un-packing it.

Then, pick through some published fiction and do the same thing. Be ruthless.

“Marty imagined fish, jumping in the moonlight…”

“Nancy recalled the way the wine tasted…”

“Larry knew he was a dead man…”

Find them. After that, find a way to re-write them. Make them stronger.

Thanks Hiraku! (via wingedbeastie)